Listen! A sower went out to sow. And as she sowed, some seed fell on the path, and the birds came and ate it up. Other seed fell on rocky ground [...] and when the sun rose, it was scorched; and since it had no root, it withered away. Other seed fell among thorns, and the thorns grew up and choked it, and it yielded no grain. Other seed fell into good soil and brought forth grain, growing up and increasing and yielding thirty and sixty and a hundredfold.
— Mark 4.3-8

Day 30

© Shutterstock. All rights reserved.

© Shutterstock. All rights reserved.

Congratulations my seedy sheroes and heroes! You've marched 3/4 of the way to the finsh line! Only ten more days of seed scattering after this one! You're almost done and you've done such a great job! I can see the finish line, so... now's the sprint at the end of the race!!!!! Make the next 10 days count! Don't worry if you've gotten off the path, you're always welcome back for our last stretch because every seed counts!


Seed of Inspiration

#TalentTuesday

Each Tuesday during our march, we'll bring you art from a seedy woman that speaks truth to power. Plant this seed of inspiration within you to sustain your energy for the march that still lies ahead...

Your Seed of Inspiration today on the artist Faith Ringgold is from Makers, the world's largest online collection of women's stories. You have 3 options for Seed of Inspiration this morning: you can choose to watch the 3 minute Makers video on her below, read her bio, and/or look at her story quilts below as your seed of inspiration today.

“Faith Ringgold is one of America’s most gifted and generous visual storytellers. Though originally trained as a painter, she has worked to superb effect across media. Ringgold is best known for the painted story quilts in which she draws on African American folklore tradition, often to dramatize—to humanize—institutional and national histories. The quilts are dazzling in their brilliant colors, their patterns and their interplay of the visual and textual. Fierce strength, good humor, eros, heartbreak and perseverance abound. Born in 1930 in New York City, Ringgold is a daughter of the Harlem Renaissance and the artistic sister of Romare Bearden and Jacob Lawrence, James Baldwin and Amiri Baraka (formerly LeRoi Jones).

”She studied at the City College of New York, where she received both bachelor’s and master’s degrees. In the early 1970s, she became a leader in the Black Arts movement and women’s arts movement, organizing protests against major museums for excluding works of black and women artists. In 1971, Ringgold co-founded Where We At, a black women artists group. The following year, she used all-female imagery in For The Women’s House, installed at the Women’s House of Detention at Riker’s Island. Ringgold’s life as an author began in 1991, with the publication of Tar Beach, the winner of multiple awards and the first of more than a dozen books. A Professor Emerita of the University of California, San Diego, Faith Ringgold lives and works in Englewood, New Jersey.
— Makers.com/FaithRinggold
© Faith Ringgold, The Picnic at Giverny, 1991, acrylic on canvas, 73.5″ ✕ 90.5″. The French Collection, no. 3. All rights reserved.

© Faith Ringgold, The Picnic at Giverny, 1991, acrylic on canvas,
73.5″ ✕ 90.5″. The French Collection, no. 3. All rights reserved.

© Faith Ringgold, We Came to America, 1997, acrylic on canvas, 74.5″ ✕ 79.5″. The American Collection, no. 1. All rights reserved.

© Faith Ringgold, We Came to America, 1997, acrylic on canvas,
74.5″ ✕ 79.5″. The American Collection, no. 1. All rights reserved.

© Faith Ringgold, Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky, 1995, book cover. All rights Reserved. Click images for purchase link.

© Faith Ringgold, Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky, 1995, book cover. All rights Reserved. Click images for purchase link.


Seed of Action

#MissingDCGirls

The following is an excerpt from the New York Times Opinion Page, "How America Fails Black Girls," written by Morgan Jenkins on March 29, 2017. You can read the full article by clicking here.

Last Wednesday in Washington, hundreds of people crowded into a town-hall meeting about the district’s many missing black and Latino kids. A photo of the event, circulated on Twitter the following morning, showed that nearly all the attendees were black.

A little over two months ago, millions of women, men and gender-nonconforming people of all races came together in the same city in support of women’s rights, workers’ rights, racial equality, freedom of speech, immigration reform and more. The online magazine Clutch and others have noted the disjunction between the march and the meeting. Had it not been for countless black people on social media sharing information, the white mainstream media would have ignored the issue altogether.

The meeting grew out of a claim that 14 black girls vanished in the nation’s capital in a single day, made in an image that spread on social media last week, that turned out to be untrue. But that inaccurate information has drawn new attention to a real problem. In a letter to the Justice Department and the F.B.I. last week, Representative Cedric Richmond of Louisiana, the chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus, and Eleanor Holmes Norton, who represents the District of Columbia in Congress, noted that 10 children of color had disappeared from their homes in the nation’s capital in two weeks, a stunning number that initially got little notice. Though the recent social-media conversation on the issue may have been set off by faulty numbers, the truth is black girls and women are still some of the most vulnerable members of society.

The journalist Gwen Ifill called the lack of attention to such disappearances “missing white woman syndrome.” Missing white, upper middle-class women and girls receive a disproportionate amount of press coverage compared to women and girls of color, poor people and men. In 2016, according to the National Crime Information Center, African-Americans, who make up only 13.3 percent of the United States population, represented 33.8 percent of the missing. Cmdr. Chanel Dickerson of the district’s police department has said that a large percentage of missing teenagers are leaving home voluntarily.

But even leaving voluntarily can be evidence of a problem. As Commander Dickerson noted, “We need to get to the bottom of why these young people feel that there’s no other alternative but to leave home.” Read more...

How can you help scatter seed to bring back our black and brown missing girls? Here are your options for your Seed of Action for today:

Cmdr. Chanel Dickerson, who leads the Metropolitan Police Department’s Youth and Family Services Division, sought to draw attention to the problem of missing girls. She succeeded.CreditJared Soares for The New York Times

Cmdr. Chanel Dickerson, who leads the Metropolitan Police Department’s Youth and Family Services Division, sought to draw attention to the problem of missing girls. She succeeded.CreditJared Soares for The New York Times

  • If you're on Facebook, follow the Black and Missing Foundation. You can also visit their website at www.bamf.org. Then, share their posts, especially if the missing person is someone in your area. Even if they aren't in your area, however, victims are often transported far. What's most important, is that you're raising awareness about an important issue and filling a gap the media has left open.
  • Make sure Amber alerts are turned on for your cell phone. To learn how to do this, if you have an iPhone, click here. If you have an Android, click here.
  • Don't have a cell phone? Go to http://www.missingkids.org/AmberSignUp, where you can choose to recieve Amber Alerts instead or in addition via email, Facebook, Twitter, Google Public Alerts Platform, and/or Yahoo! Alerts.
  • Take it one step further, and bookmark this site: http://www.missingkids.org/Amber. If an Amber alert is issued in your area, and you notice on the website the child has not been recovered nor is your local news station paying attention, call them.
  • Make sure your media digest is as diverse as our country so that you know about issues concerning our communities of color that are underreported in the media. You can do this by subscribing to a periodical like Ebony or Jet. If you use Facebook, you can subscribe to HuffPost Black Voices or Black Lives Matter.

Love Notes

  • Share Seeds to Scatter by email or by social media with the links below. After our march, I intend to maintain a monthly or weekly blog (haven't decided yet), with another march during the season of Advent, so we still need new scatterers to join us! Thanks for casting a seed back my way by sharing S2S!

  • Show us your seeds! Share with us images and stories of you scattering seeds by emailing me at seedstoscatter@gmail.com, posting on our Facebook page, or sending us a tweet @seedstoscatter!

  • And above all, scatter with love!

Day 31

Day 29